The Eurozone Crisis Drags On

Europe is nearly through its August holiday and the only evidence of progress in the debt crisis has been press releases and sound bites from vacationing heads of state. Recently, however, the German weekly newsmagazine Der Spiegel reported that the European Central Bank (ECB) is once again debating a plan to cap interest rates in countries like Spain and Italy by buying unlimited amounts of their bonds.

The ECB, of course, immediately denied the report, as the plan’s potential to saddle German taxpayers with huge debt makes it a political non-starter for the EU’s most powerful member. Just to underline how Germany doesn’t (at least publically) approve, both the German Finance Ministry and the Bundesbank made it clear that any such plan is unacceptable, which didn’t stop the Spanish and Italian bond markets from rising on the news, thereby lowering interest rates.

Meanwhile, the Eurozone economy, as expected, contracted in the second quarter, with Germany positive, France flat, and most of the remaining countries negative. Less government spending, lack of hiring and worsening consumer sentiment led to a consensus estimate from economists of further contraction in the third quarter followed by weak growth in the fourth.

None of that is good news for the American economy or American investors. Europe as a whole is our largest trading partner, so slack demand across the Atlantic means lowered demand here, slower job growth, and lower profits for many American companies, particularly those with a large percentage of their business overseas. (Think Coca-Cola, Microsoft and General Motors, just to name a few.)

Compounding the problem is the continuing uncertainty as the Euro crisis drags on, month after month, with stalemate, and often economic impotence, built into the structure of the European Union itself. Don’t look for a resolution any time soon.

As always, the best defense is a diversified portfolio and the advice of a smart, experienced financial advisor.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: