Our “One and a Half Cents” on the Fourth Quarter – Part One

January 4, 2011

The stock market posted strong gains during the third quarter after rebounding from the low of the year that occurred near the end of the second quarter. The S&P 500 posted an 11% gain for the quarter. The strong gains during the quarter were far from steady. Volatility was high as the S&P 500 moved up and down within a 10% trading range. Cyclical, Mid-Cap, and European stocks fared the best during the quarter:

The highly cyclical Materials, Industrial, and Consumer Discretionary sectors were among the best performers while the legislation-sensitive Financials and Health Care sectors lagged.

According to data from the U.S. Treasury, purchases of U.S. stocks by foreigners in the third quarter of 2010 were likely strong based on the latest data available for July. On average, demand in recent quarters has only been exceeded in the past by the surge in buying around the market peaks in 2000 and 2007.

However, those foreign investors saw almost none of the strong gains in the U.S. stock market translate into their holdings due to the decline in the value of the dollar. The performance of the dollar-denominated S&P 500, when adjusted for the value of the dollar against major trading partners, was relatively flat for the quarter. If foreign investors fear further declines in the dollar, they may restrict their buying of U.S. stocks.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. All performance reference is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly.

Advertisements

Vacation Properties and Income – Part 2

September 14, 2009

Another way for retirees to generate income from a vacation home is to sell it. By using the federal capital gains exclusion in conjunction with the sale of your primary residence, you can potentially realize tax-free income. Here’s how it works. The basic capital gains exclusion rules state that you must have owned and used the home as your primary residence for at least two years out of the five-year period ending on the date of the sale. If you are married, the full $500,000 exclusion ($250,000 for single homeowners) is available as long as one or both of you satisfies the ownership test (two years) and you both satisfy the use test (primary residence).


Vacation Properties and Income – Part 1

September 10, 2009

If you have a vacation home, you’re already aware of the enjoyment it provides and the benefits it can offer at tax time. But you may not be aware of how vacation property can be used to generate income in retirement or how it can play into an estate plan. In fact, vacation properties offer retirees a number of different options in managing their finances and estate.
Vacation property may be used to generate income in several different ways. The first, and most obvious, is renting it. The IRS allows you to deduct mortgage interest on your primary residence and one additional property up to a limit of $1 million in combined mortgage debt for mortgages taken out after 1987. Current tax rules also allow you to rent out a second home for up to 14 days per year without having to report the rent as income. If you rent for more than 14 days, the home is considered investment property, and rent must be reported as income. Converting the property to an investment property, however, allows you to deduct rental expenses, such as insurance and utilities, if you have a net profit on the property (deductions are limited if you report a loss). You can still use an income-producing property for personal use while maintaining your tax advantages — but only for the greater of 14 days or 10 percent of the total days it is rented. Maintenance days do not count as personal-use days, but use by in-laws or other part-owners does, even if rent is charged.


Simple Truths

September 8, 2009

As a financial advising firm, one of the simple truths we have learned is that relationships are the single greatest influence on how people use their money and plan for the future. When people talk about their hopes and dreams, they talk about the people they love. Their future, the life they wish to live, is always full of the people most important to them. They don’t talk first about dollars and cents, Dow averages, or bond yields. They talk about a spouse, a parent, a child. When imagining their financial futures, even those without family often focus on others, such as employees, friends, faith communities, and charities.


Keeping Your Emotions in Check…

September 3, 2009

In times like these, with the economy in a tailspin, and the stock market in the tank, investing requires an extra dose of patience, perseverance and perspective.
It takes patience to ride out the bear market, perseverance to continue to invest even through a difficult economy, and perspective to see the long-term picture and realize that recessions and bear markets are just part of the natural economic cycle. Slumping economies and bear markets of the past have always turned around — and there is no reason to believe that this time will be any different.


Saving for College

August 31, 2009

Saving for College
Another school year is around the corner and your children or grandchildren are that much closer to college. If you haven’t already started to save for their college costs, this may be a good time to talk to your adviser about setting up a tax-sheltered college savings plan.
By planning ahead, you can use a 529 college savings plan to give your children a head start on their college costs. There are two types of 529 plans: college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans.
College savings plans are state sponsored investment accounts that allow participants to contribute regularly. A 529 plan account grows tax-deferred and withdrawals from the plan for qualified educational expenses are exempt from federal income tax. There are no income limits.


How Are Your Spending Habits?

August 18, 2009

The Propensity to Consume

Most People and most societies consume what they can. Americans are notoriously short-sighted, as demonstrated by a low personal savings rate by international standards. There could be many explanations, from a standard of affluence that has distanced us from the struggle for mere survival, to our propensity to invent and create that places a premium on spending whatever money we have in order to create more. We are the consumer society. Just look at the ads in magazines or newspapers and calculate the percentage of them that sell what for most people are luxuries.
You may be surprised to find that you are guilty of a habit that dooms you to never having money. Some people who constantly feel money pressure buy themselves little treats or rewards, in part because they never have the money to buy themselves what they really want. But it’s precisely that accumulation of “little” expenses that prevents them from getting ahead. Many don’t even realize they do this. The only way to find out is to keep track of what you spend. Do it for a week or a month. Try to remember each expenditure, no matter how small. Record everything in a little notebook each day. Add them up in different categories at the end of your test period: food and drink, entertainment, utilities, gifts and so forth. Pay particular attention to the small expenditures on unnecessary items and see how they accumulate over time.