Be It Resolved: Meet Your 2012 Money Goals

January 4, 2012

The time for those New Year’s resolutions is upon us.

In my opinion, making financial resolutions doesn’t have to be painful. If you follow some simple guidelines, financial and other resolutions don’t have to be overwhelming. Remember that the key to reaching any goal is to make it specific, achievable and measurable. Celebrate and reward yourself once you get there. And realize that it’s perfectly acceptable – and smart – to ask for a little help when needed.

Be it resolved: Health first
Before getting into financial resolutions, I want to mention how important it is to consider your health and make it a priority. This is a great place to start with resolutions because there are so many ways to improve health without spending much money. You can go for more walks, which are absolutely free. Or take an exercise class or buy (and use!) a cookbook that focuses on healthy foods. Try a healthy new activity and see if it gives you some extra energy and enthusiasm for your financial resolutions.

Be it resolved: Save and invest more
Based on my conversations with clients, family members and friends, saving more and spending less always seem to be the most popular financial resolutions. The two things go hand in hand and may sound simple, but many people find it difficult to build their savings to the level they desire. You need the right perspective and a specific, achievable savings goal in order to succeed.

Saving really boils down to paying yourself first. For most people, a realistic goal is to save 10 percent of your income. If your employer offers a retirement savings plan with matching contributions, resolve to make the most of it and contribute as much as you can. It is one of the best ways of boosting your savings. You may also want to open and begin making regular contributions to a Roth IRA, which allows you to make tax-free withdrawals of your direct contributions at any time.

Be it resolved: Pay off inefficient debt
If you are one of the many people who want to dump a debt burden this year, you need to know that not all debt is created equal.

Efficient debt isn’t so bad, but you will want to get rid of inefficient debt as soon as possible. Efficient debt works for you because it is tax-deductible and/or appreciates in value. Examples include a home mortgage or an investment in education that can increase your earning power. Inefficient debt includes high-interest credit card debt and debt used to buy things that depreciate and are not deductible, like automobiles and many other consumer goods. Resolve to pay off inefficient debt first.

Be it resolved: Consult a financial advisor
If you feel overwhelmed just thinking about financial resolutions, it’s the perfect time to consult with a financial advisor. A professional can help you get organized, identify goals, save time and find ways for you to maximize your financial efficiency this year.

Best wishes for a healthy and prosperous 2012!

Wealth Enhancement Group

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Final Words on Debt

September 29, 2009

If you have incurred inefficient debt, one method of eliminating It is to transfer the debt to your home equity. Many people are reluctant to use their home equity to consolidate other debt. This reluctance really stems from a mind-set that is behind the times. Certainly, 30 years ago, if people refinanced their home or took out a second mortgage, you can be sure the neighbors were talking behind their backs about their financial woes. But using your home’s equity is economically wise.

It provides low Interest rates, a tax deduction, and an extended amortization.

However, even this form of debt should not be used recklessly. Defaulting on a mortgage of any kind has greater consequences than defaulting on consumer loans. Mortgage loans are secured by your home, which means that if you can’t make payments, you will lose your home. Consumer credit lenders cannot take such drastic remedies.

Avoid all other kinds of debt, including the high-risk debt of stock margin purchases and stock and commodity options. Leave those investments to the professional gamblers. Otherwise, buy only what you can pay for with cash.

Final words on debt. When to use it: rarely. How to use it: to increase your net worth or long-term quality of life, not to buy more things…